Tuesday, March 1 2005
By Michael Kane

In this special report, Michael Kane recounts the personal story of JP Morgan IT professional, Indira Singh, a heroic 9/11 whistleblower who was fired, harrassed, and physically threatened for exposing the Saudi/terrorist-linked origins of one of the government’s most pervasive software systems, and thereby offering the 9/11 Commission more truth than it ever wanted to know. – Editor

“Ptech had all the markings,” said Indira Singh. All the markings of a CIA front company.”

“I think there is a CIA within the CIA,” Indira told From the Wilderness (FTW). “I think there is a Shadow CIA that does the Iran-Contra type of things–they get funding from illicit methods–and that the Saudi’s are in on it. They might have trained some operatives, and later it backfired – it was blowback within blowback, perhaps.”

“What I do know, what the money trails do show, is that the Saudi’s are complicit. In other words, the ones that are extremely fundamentalist, the ones that promote Wahabiism-I’m not saying it’s all of them, but parts of them–are working hand-in-hand, lock step with elements within American intelligence whether it’s official or unofficial. There’s proof of that.”

March 2, 2005 (911truth.org): Wall Street whistleblower Indira Singh has had her professional life ripped away from her because of keeping the promise she made to some 3,000 victim’s who died at Ground Zero on 9/11. She made that promise at Ground Zero on 9/11 as a civilian EMT. Indira was supposed to be on the 106th floor of the World Trade Center that morning, but she was late.

“I made a promise,” said Indira during a lengthy FTW interview, “that if anything fell into my lap, I wouldn’t look the other way and I’m keeping that promise.”

Something did fall into her lap . . . something big.

Indira is an IT professional who started First Boston’s Information Technology Group in 1970 and had worked on Wall Street up until 2002. She has been an IT consultant for Bank Trust, the U.N., JP Morgan, and American Express. In 1988 she started TibetNet, a derivative of the Defense Advanced Research Project (DARPA) Internet, the service on which you are likely reading this report at the moment.

On 9/11/2001, Indira worked for JP Morgan in a field called Risk Management, involving computer systems and programs designed to keep JP Morgan’s entire information and financial structure safe. She had also worked with a Defense Advanced Research Project – DARPA-funded technology group, with close ties to the CIA. This provided her with contacts deep within the government and corporate America. She was working on a program for JP Morgan – the next generation of risk software – whose function was to think about all the information going on throughout the enterprise as bank business was being conducted worldwide.

It would detect money laundering and other crimes in real time and then do something about it; perhaps alert an “intelligent” software agent or a person, or shutdown the transaction immediately. This capability could be accomplished by using an evolution of PROMIS software. FTW has extensively covered the PROMIS software controversy, the software stolen by the Justice Department from Inslaw which over the past two decades has evolved and merged with artificial intelligence.

“We were moving into the realm of much smarter software – next generation software – that would collect information on the fly and sort of think about it,” said Indira. The CIA was interested in the technology behind Indira’s risk application at one point. So was the Defense Department.

Indira’s vision was to create software that could respond to “extreme event risk.” 9/11 was an extreme event. Risk Management involves devising ways to stop big problems from happening throughout the enterprise. She needed a company to provide a key piece of this enterprise software.

“All the industry gurus recommended Ptech.”

Indira was unsure whether Ptech was right. After all, they were a small company, and with software this expensive you couldn’t afford to choose wrong. But everywhere she looked boosted her confidence in Ptech, especially when viewing their list of prominent clients.

The White House, Treasury Department (Secret Service), CIA, FBI, both houses of Congress, Air Force, Navy, Department of Energy, IRS, Booze Allen Hamilton, IBM, Enron and even NATO all used, and as of this writing, some still use Ptech software. IBM, a global strategic partner with JP Morgan, had selected Ptech for their Preferred Vendor program.

All of this convinced Indira that Ptech was the right choice. After getting the extensive site clearance JP Morgan required, Indira invited Ptech to the premises for a one-day evaluation of their software. But according to Indira, everything was wrong that day. They didn’t come with anything needed to do the one-day evaluation, but Ptech’s chief scientist, Dr. Hussein Ibrahim, suggested to Indira that they develop the software on his laptop.

“If you know how these things are conducted, that was a show stopper,” says Indira. Ptech would have been able to walk away with the blueprint to Indira’s program on their laptop, and JP Morgan would have been left with nothing. Indira decided Ibrahim’s proposition was a definite deal breaker.

Risk blueprints worth millions of dollars aren’t given away at an introductory meeting; the industry doesn’t work that way. To this day Indira is unsure of why Ibrahim would have even suggested this. “He’s not a stupid man,” she said, “he knows this is not how business is conducted.”

Click on link to read the rest of the article on the Journey of a Wall Street Whistleblower.

Radio interview of Indira Singh and her investigation of PTech.