By Stewart Ogilby
Veterans Today
December 10, 2011

I recall my father calling my brother and me into the house from the backyard where we were at play that brisk December afternoon, December 7th, 1941. He had us listen to a news report coming from our Philco radio and told us that we would remember that day for the rest of our lives. It was then that I had my introduction to foreign affairs.

Somewhere in the world, a long distance from Staten Island, New York, a place called Pearl Harbor had been attacked by airplanes. As he explained, since that was a part of our country we were in a war.

We had a small mounted globe of the world in the dining room close to the radio. Showing us where Japan is located, he told us that Japan was our enemy. He went on to say that there was another country, considerably more dangerous, with which we would soon be at war. Turning the globe all the way around, he pointed to Germany.

He said that Germany’s goal was to conquer the world. Placing my finger on the small area called Germany I asked, “How can a little country like that take over this huge globe?” Father said that they were already well on their way, showing us areas Germany had occupied. “Do you think that we will win?”, I asked. I recall my father looking very grave and saying, “Yes, we will win, but it will be very difficult and things will never be the same.”

My father was honest, a brilliant self-educated research chemist, a farmer, and a patriotic man. Years after I had left home and my father was approaching retirement, there was a television in the farm house, an item I had never seen there before. During a visit, as my father watched Watergate unfold I saw tears come to his eyes when President Richard Nixon appeared on screen. “That man lied to us”, he muttered. By “us” he meant my mother and himself. Both had voted for Nixon. The patriot in him had been betrayed. My Dad would be 110 years old. I wonder what he and others of that generation would think today.

The historian, Harry Elmer Barnes, concluded that President Roosevelt had been designing a casus belli with Japan in 1941, having personally ordered three small US Naval ships to sea to confront the mighty Japanese navy. In my own small library I treasure a copy of Admiral Kemp Tolley’s, Cruise of the Lanikai. Tolley had been CO of one of those three small antiquated 1941 US Navy vessels. His book contains a photocopy of that order, signed personally by President Roosevelt.

When that ruse failed, Roosevelt had no recourse other than to engineer, by default, the December 7th Pearl Harbor attack. The machines used for decoding Japan’s Purple Code had been deliberately removed from Hawaii, leaving both our Army and Navy commanders there blindfolded. Barnes’ work and conclusions have since been completely verified through FOIA documents.

Link to the rest of the article One Lie After Another – And Now 911