Tue, 01/27/2015 –
Source: news.investors.com

Take note of two recent articles on the subject.

You Can’t Point a Finger at Saudi Arabia, and Not Have 5 Fingers Pointing Back to the U.S.

About those 28 Redacted Pages…

Read more about him at www.historycommons.org

Mideast: President Obama should think before bowing to Saudi Arabia’s new king in his Tuesday visit. King Salman has a history of funding al-Qaida, and his son has been accused of knowing in advance about the 9/11 attacks.

When it comes to jihadism, Salman bin Abdulaziz al Saud is more of a hardliner than his older brother, King Abdullah, who died last week of a lung infection. As such, any commitment he makes to helping the U.S. destroy al-Qaida and Islamic State terrorists should be viewed with great suspicion.

The 79-year-old Salman once ran a Saudi charity tied to al-Qaida and has been named a defendant in two lawsuits accusing the Saudi royal family of helping the 9/11 terrorists, one of which the U.S. Supreme Court recently let move forward after years of being blocked by the State Department and the well-funded Saudi lobby.

Plaintiffs have provided an enormous amount of material to source their accusations against Salman. Here’s why his ascension to the throne is not good news, especially as the terrorism threat grows:

Salman once headed the Saudi High Commission for Relief to Bosnia and Herzegovina, which served as a key charitable front for al-Qaida in the Balkans.
According to a United Nations-sponsored investigation, Salman in the 1990s transferred more than $120 million from commission accounts under his control — as well as his own personal accounts — to the Third World Relief Agency, another al-Qaida front and the main pipeline for illegal weapons shipments to al-Qaida fighters in the Balkans.
A U.N. audit found that the money was transferred following meetings with Salman, transfers that had no legitimate “humanitarian” purpose.
Former CIA officer Robert Baer has reported that an international raid of Saudi High Commission offices found evidence of terrorist plots against America.
Baer also revealed that Salman “personally approved” distribution of funds from the International Islamic Relief Organization, which also has provided material support to al-Qaida.
A recent Gulf Institute report says Salman and former Saudi intelligence chief Prince Turki al-Faisal knowingly aided and abetted al-Qaida in the run-up to 9/11.
Salman works closely with Saudi clerics Saleh al-Moghamsy, a radical anti-Semite, and Safar Hawali, a one-time mentor of Osama bin Laden, according to the Washington Free Beacon.
In “Why America Slept,” author Gerald Posner claimed that Salman’s son Ahmed bin Salman also had ties to al-Qaida and even advance knowledge of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.
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A recap of recent events from different sources…

This week, Obama cancelled a trip to the Taj Mahal so he could go pay his respects for King Abdullah in Saudi Arabia. He went to see the new King, Salman bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, who just happens to be named as a defendant in a law suit against Saudi Arabia brought about by 9/11 Families. Some of the people that accompanied him were John McCain (who loves the 9/11 Report which absolved the Saudi Arabian Government), James A. Baker (his law firm Baker Botts represented the Saudis against the 9/11 Families in a lawsuit), and Condoleezza Rice (who lied before the 9/11 Commission, and had an oil rig named after her).

Michael Smerconish asked White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough about the 28 redacted pages of the Joint Congressional Inquiry Into 9/11, something the families have been fighting for the release of for years, and he said “well, this is obviously an issue that you have been working on for some time. And this goes back across administrations. We’re – the president will be visiting Riyadh to express our condolences and to underscore the important issues that we have going on in the region. I’m not going to get involved in the 28 pages now, Michael, any more than I did before.”

After arriving in Riyadh, Obama defended the U.S.’s relationship with Saudi Arabia considering their human rights issues by saying that “sometimes we need to balance our need to speak to them about human rights issues with immediate concerns we have in terms of counterterrorism or dealing with regional stability.” Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said “we do believe that Saudi policy will remain quite similar to how it’s been under King Abdullah,” he said, adding Obama wanted to forge the same kind of “close relationship” with Salman as he had with his predecessor.”

Former President George H.W. Bush praised Saudi Arabia’s alliance with the U.S. after Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990, an invasion that led to the first Gulf War. Calling Abdullah a “dear friend and partner,” the first President Bush said he would “never forget the way Saudi Arabia and the United States stood together against a common foe — marking a moment of unparalleled cooperation between two great nations.” Bush’s son, former President George W. Bush, called the king “an important and able ally and a force for modernization in his country.”

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff has established a research and essay competition in honor of Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Bin Abdul-Aziz hosted by the National Defense University. The competition will focus on issues related to the Arab-Muslim world and is designed to encourage strategic thinking and meaningful research on a crucial part of the world. The program will be in place at NDU for the next academic year, officials said.