Our next president must choose peace and prosperity over war and debt.

John J. Duncan Jr.
May 2, 2016
The National Interest

Somewhat to my surprise, the decision to go to war in Iraq in 2002 has been a major issue in this year’s race for the White House.

Sen. Bernie Sanders has questioned the judgment of Sec. Hillary Clinton for voting for the war when she was in the Senate.

Donald Trump has used his early opposition to the war as a selling point in his quest for the Republican nomination.

I am now the only Republican remaining in Congress of the six in the House who voted against going to war in Iraq.

It has been both fascinating and surprising to me that what was certainly the most unpopular vote I ever cast has very slowly become possibly the most popular.

The night before that 2002 vote I was told of a poll in my district that showed 74 percent of my constituents supported the war, with 17 percent undecided. Only 9 percent opposed the war.

I had voted for the first Gulf War in 1991 after attending briefings by Gen. Colin Powell, Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf and other high-ranking officials that made Saddam Hussein sound like the Second Coming of Hitler.

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