AE911Truth — Architects & Engineers Investigating the destruction of all three World Trade Center skyscrapers on September 11

Shear studs are used to keep steel floor beams and girders in place; they impart stability and strength to buildings. But in its November 2008 final report, NIST reworded its comments on shear studs to give the appearance that none were used on the floor girders.

MISSING SHEAR STUDS

By Chris Sarns and Judy Shelton

Part 1 of Chris Sarns’ report, which examines the burned-out fire in WTC 7, is available here.

Part 2 of Chris Sarns’ report, which examines NIST’s claim of thermal expansion, is available here.

Part 3 (below) was originally published on August 22, 2013.

NIST’s final report on the collapse of World Trade Center Building 7, issued in November 2008, has many flaws, including blatant fraud.

If we go back to its June 2004 Progress Report (and in the actual shop drawings*), NIST referenced shear studs, which are used to keep steel floor beams and girders in place and to impart stability and strength to buildings.

But in its final report four years later, NIST reworded its comments on shear studs to give the appearance that none were used on the floor girders.

Why would NIST make this fraudulent statement?

To know the answer, one needs to understand NIST’s collapse theory, which goes like this:

1. The key girder between column 79 and the exterior wall failed at Floor 13.

2. That failure caused the collapse of Floors 13 through 6.

3. Column 79, now unsupported laterally by these floors, buckled and brought down the entire building.

Obviously, this scenario posited by NIST sounds more credible if the key girder isn’t being held firmly in place with shear studs. So, then, by magically omitting the shear studs, NIST validates its theory that the key girder failed.

Compare the two quotes from NIST below.

In this first paragraph excerpt of its 2004 report, NIST says that studs were used with both beams and girders, although the studs “were not indicated on the design drawings for many of the core girders.” (By the way, the girder associated with column 79 was not a core girder.)

“Most of the beams and girders were made composite with the slabs through the use of shear studs.* Typically, the shear studs were 0.75 in. in diameter by 5 in. long, spaced 1 ft to 2 ft on center.** Studs were not indicated on the design drawings for many of the core girders.” — NIST June 2004 Progress Report, Appendix L, pages 6-7 [PDF pages 895-896]

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